Token of a Nations Sorrow: Addresses in the Congress of the United States, and Funeral Solemnities on the Death of John Quincy Adams, Who Died in the Capitol at Washington, on Wednesday Evening, February 23, 1848 United States Th Congress

ISBN: 9781331514480

Published: September 27th 2015

Paperback

48 pages


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Token of a Nations Sorrow: Addresses in the Congress of the United States, and Funeral Solemnities on the Death of John Quincy Adams, Who Died in the Capitol at Washington, on Wednesday Evening, February 23, 1848  by  United States Th Congress

Token of a Nations Sorrow: Addresses in the Congress of the United States, and Funeral Solemnities on the Death of John Quincy Adams, Who Died in the Capitol at Washington, on Wednesday Evening, February 23, 1848 by United States Th Congress
September 27th 2015 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 48 pages | ISBN: 9781331514480 | 10.35 Mb

Excerpt from Token of a Nations Sorrow: Addresses in the Congress of the United States, and Funeral Solemnities on the Death of John Quincy Adams, Who Died in the Capitol at Washington, on Wednesday Evening, February 23, 1848The circumstancesMoreExcerpt from Token of a Nations Sorrow: Addresses in the Congress of the United States, and Funeral Solemnities on the Death of John Quincy Adams, Who Died in the Capitol at Washington, on Wednesday Evening, February 23, 1848The circumstances connected with the death of the venerable Representative from Massachusetts were so peculiar, that we deem it proper to register them in this Token of a nations sorrow - this frail tribute of respect to the memory of departed worth.Though he had been quite feeble for the last year, Mr.

Adams entered the Hall of the House of Representatives on Monday, the 21st of February, in his usual health and spirits. When the House had been in session about an hour, the yeas and nays being ordered on a question, he responded in a voice unusually clear, and with more than ordinary emphasis.

The painful scene that followed is thus described with accuracy and feeling in the National Intelligencer of the next morning:Just after the yeas and nays were taken on a question, and the Speaker had risen to put another question to the House, a sudden cry was heard on the left of the chair, Mr. Adams is dying! Turning our eyes to the spot, we beheld the venerable man in the act of falling over the left arm of his chair, while his right arm was extended, grasping his desk for support. He would have dropped upon the floor had he not been caught in the arms of the member sitting next to him.

A great sensation was created in the House- members from all quarters rushing from their seats and gathering round the fallen statesman, who was immediately lifted into the area in front of the Clerks table. The Speaker instantly suggested that some gentleman move an adjournment, which being promptly done, the House adjourned. A sofa was brought, and Mr. Adams, in a state of perfect helplessness, though not of entire insensibility, was gently laid upon it.

The sofa was then taken up and borne out of the Hall into the Rotundo, where it was set down, and the members of both Houses and strangers, who were fast crowding around, were with some difficulty repressed, and an open space cleared in its immediate vicinity- but a medical gentleman, a member of the House, (who was prompt, active, and self-possessed throughout the whole painful scene, ) advised that he be removed to the door of the Rotundo opening on the east portico, where a fresh wind was blowing.

This was done- but the air being chilly and loaded with vapor, the sofa was, at the suggestion of Mr. Winthrop, once more taken up and removed to the Speakers apartment, the doors of which were forthwith closed to all but professional gentlemen and particular friends.

While lying in this apartment, Mr. Adams partially recovered the use of his speech, and observed, in faltering accents, This is the end of earth- but quickly added, I am composed. Members had by this time reached Mr. A.s abode with the melancholy intelligence, and, soon after, Mrs. Adams and his nephew and niece arrived, and made their way to the appalling scene.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books.

Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy.

In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.



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